John Neville is a hoot

Most species of owls have been on a steady decline in B.C., largely due to a loss of habitat.

John Neville shows different types of owls to a captivated audience at the Fernie Heritage Library.

John Neville shows different types of owls to a captivated audience at the Fernie Heritage Library.

by Shelby Cain

Contributor

Hoots were heard at the Fernie Heritage Library when John Neville stopped by and spoke to a full house about Owls of B.C.

Neville’s articles are published in a number of nature journals and his recordings have been used by the Canadian Wildlife Service, CBC Television’s The Nature of Things, and Parks Canada interpretive programs.  His major aim is that his nature recordings will make people more aware of the feathered creatures and their need for protected habitat.

Most species of owls have been on a steady decline in B.C., largely due to a loss of habitat.  Neville hopes that by getting people, and specifically children interested in our winged friends, they may be more inclined to get involved in preserving their homes.

Neville’s work is presently exhibited in the new Robert Bateman Center in Victoria. He is currently working on his most ambitious project to date, Bird Songs of Canada.