Camaro 67

Afro-funk band Camaro 67 brings beats to Wapiti

Camaro 67 is likely to take up the entire stage at Wapiti Music Festival, and it isn’t just because of the band’s sound.

Camaro 67 is likely to take up the entire stage at Wapiti Music Festival, and it isn’t just because of the band’s sound. The Vancouver-based band also feature 10 members, playing a variety of instruments.

The band’s keyboardist, Georges Couling, describes the band’s sound as being the “afro-funk” genre.

“We describe it as kind of afro-funk. It’s kind of a cross between funk and afro beat. It originated over in Nigeria – Nigerian dance music, typically with very big bands of 10 people or more,” he told The Free Press.

The band cites their musical inspirations as Fela Kuti, Tony Allen in the afrobeat genre, along with Antibalas and Budos Band for the afro-funk and groove influence.

The band played its first show together last September, however, some members of the group have played in other projects together.

“The band itself is pretty new. Half of us were part of another group called Miami DeVice, which we were together for maybe seven years. As that group disbanded, half of us kind of wanted to keep playing this kind of style of music, we started this new group called Camaro 67 and got some other players to fill in where needed,” said Couling.

While many members have toured extensively with other groups, this will be the farthest Camaro 67 has ventured for a show. Couling admits it is quite the effort for 10 people, along with all of their instruments and equipment, to tour.

The band’s first album, Burn Rubber, Not Your Soul was released on Apr. 9 and Couling says they are touring in support of that album. After Wapiti, they will be playing shows in Nelson and Kelowna before returning to Vancouver.

Catch the Camaro 67’s set at Wapiti at 3 p.m. on Aug. 13.