(Waveland/Facebook)

(Waveland/Facebook)

Virtual concert series Songs for Seniors to bring families separated by COVID together

Songs for Seniors is hoping to bring communities and their families together virtually, no matter where

By Charlie Carey

A virtual concert series for seniors, people in long-term care homes, and those isolated due to COVID-19 will kick-off later this month.

Funded by the Canadian Red Cross and presented by Waveland, Songs for Seniors will feature up-and-coming Canadian artists over a six-week period, beginning Dec. 30. Shows will take place every Monday and Wednesday afternoon online through Zoom until Feb. 3, 2021.

Non-profit music organization Waveland believes that “experiencing and engaging with Canadian music is a major contributing factor to sustaining social bonds among the people within our communities.”

An especially trying time for those separated from their families, Songs for Seniors is hoping to bring communities and their families together virtually, no matter where they may be located. A live chat feature will be available, where families are able to talk to each other during the performances.

“With Songs for Seniors, we want to harness the power of digital technologies in order to provide social support and a sense of belonging for these isolated communities,” said Del Mahabadi, Waveland founder.

“Live virtual music will enhance mental health and well-being in our seniors, and ensure they continue to feel connected to their communities throughout the pandemic.”

This concert series will also provide paid opportunities for musicians who have been impacted by the pandemic. Each performance will be followed by a Q&A session, where concert-goers will be able to ask questions and learn more about the artists.

Performing artists include Joyia, Aphrose, Chris Oday, Alex Bird, Kubla, and Eunice Keitan.

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