Wildsight introduces Wild Ideas events

Wildsight has started a new series of events called Wild Ideas, dedicated to gathering people who care for the environment.

Wildsight has started a new series of events called Wild Ideas, dedicated to gathering people who care for the environment for healthy discussions about various topics.

The first one was hosted on Oct. 19 at Infinitea, and doubled as an election party.

A projector played the election results live while there were information pamphlets describing each party’s stance on the environment.

“Our idea for Wild Ideas came when I became President last May. I really wanted to get a conversation going, a really loose conversation about the environment,” said Sharon Switzer, President of Wildsight’s Elk Valley branch.

“We picked the day even before we realized it was the election. It totally worked out for us that way, and I think it was really great to get a conversation going non-partisan about what each party is going to do for the environment and see how it goes. We are really happy that it landed this way.”

Switzer said that regardless of the election results, the environment is an issue that deserves attention and discussions.

“But I think the conversation about the environment is hot and we’re not going to let it go and that’s what we are interested in,” she said.

Switzer was also encouraged by the number of youth who participated in the federal election, hoping that it is a sign for change.

“They haven’t had a job in mining for the last 30 years, and they’re not scared and they want it to change. And they’re not scared it’s not going to happen, and how uncomfortable they’re going to have to feel, because they already feel uncomfortable in our world, so I think that is important.”

Wild Ideas wants to start discussions on the local level, where the environmental impacts can be seen.

“I think wild ideas is going to get a lot of people talking, where before they were just reading stuff on Facebook and on the Internet, liking it, engaging in their minds, but I think they want to act locally and that’s what this is about,” said Switzer.

 

Wild Ideas next event will be held at Infinitea on Nov. 16 at 7 p.m. Local environmental advocate, Ryland Nelson will be speaking about current information and upgrades to logging in the local area, and discussion and questions are welcomed.

 

 

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