New Zealand campaign had concerns using Eminem-like song

New Zealand campaign had concerns using Eminem-like song

WELLINGTON, New Zealand — The campaign manager for New Zealand’s National Party said Wednesday she raised concerns during the 2014 election about using a song that sounded similar to Eminem’s “Lose Yourself” but was told by industry experts it would be fine.

Jo de Joux told the High Court in Wellington she was concerned that using the song “Eminem Esque” raised copyright issues for the party, and she was also worried that Eminem had been associated with hate speech.

Eminem’s music publishers Eight Mile Style are suing the conservative political party for copyright infringement after it used the song in TV ads.

De Joux said she sought and received assurances from music and advertising experts that using “Eminem Esque” would be acceptable because it was part of a licensed music library and was free from any copyright issues.

She said focus groups favoured the song and the campaign ad was run 186 times before it was pulled in August 2014.

She said she’d fielded complaints in a previous campaign about the use of a Coldplay song.

“I was therefore adamant that the party did not want to have to deal with any such complaints during the 2014 campaign,” she said. “I needed absolute reassurance that the track could be legitimately used by the party before I was willing to recommend that we proceed.”

Under cross-examination, de Joux said she had not sought legal advice on using the song nor approached Eminem’s representatives to get approval.

De Joux was the first defence witness in the judge-only case that began Monday and is expected to last about six days.

Her testimony came a day after composer Jeff Bass called “Eminem Esque” a “blatant rip-off” of “Lose Yourself.” Bass, who lives near Detroit, co-wrote the Oscar-winning 2002 song with Eminem and Luis Resto.

The publishers are seeking both a cash settlement for an undisclosed amount and an acknowledgement by the court that the National Party breached copyright.

The defence argues that while the songs are similar, they aren’t the same and therefore the party never breached copyright.

Nick Perry, The Associated Press

Just Posted

Former Riders coach reflects

Mohr looking for new opportunities after contract ends

Athletes ready for world stage

Three Fernie athletes to compete in the world’s biggest junior freeride competition.

Hydro prices to surge

Elk Valley businesses brace for 3 per cent Hydro rate increase.

Elk Valley rallies for car fire victim

Aussie loses everything in car fire

Fernie operator wins tourism award

Island Lake Lodge recognised for “inclusive, team-oriented culture” at 2018 Tourism Industry Awards.

VIDEO: B.C. Mounties reunite veteran with lost military medals

RCMP say Zora Singh Tatla, who served in the army in India for 28 years, is the righful owner

Free breast cancer screening

Early detection saving lives

Sparwood skaters impress

Club farewells coach

Army cadets test survival skills

Cadets endure -18C conditions

Exhibition builds compassion

Opioid use in focus

Medicinal cannabis patient shares story

Fernie mom spreads compassion

Epic deal for FAR

RCR signs new partnership

Search continues for 10-year-old Montreal boy missing since Monday

Montreal police said they are exploring every possibility in search for Ariel Jeffrey Kouakou

Airline passenger-rights bill claws back protections for travellers: Advocate

Bill C-49 would double tarmac delays, scrap compensation for flights affected by mechanical failures

Most Read