B.C. residents back hunting for food, but not trophies: Poll

Opinion is more split on zoos and rodeos, but survey shows we strongly oppose trophy hunting and fur trapping

The issue of trophy hunting was the hot topic earlier this fall after NHL player Clayton Stoner shot a grizzly bear on the B.C. coast.

A new poll shows most B.C. residents support hunting wildlife for food but oppose trophy hunting and fur trapping.

The online survey by Insights West found 85 per cent are in favour of eating animals and 73 per cent support hunting animals for meat.

But just one in 10 support hunting strictly for sport, with 88 per cent opposed.

Killing animals for their fur had 15 per cent support and was rejected by 81 per cent.

The topic of trophy hunting gained prominence earlier this fall when B.C.-born NHL player Clayton Stoner shot a grizzly bear while hunting with a licence issued by the province as part of an annual lottery.

The bear’s nickname was ‘Cheeky’, and it was being documented by filmmakers from Coastal First Nations (CFN), who oppose bear hunting in the Great Bear Rainforest.

“It is abundantly clear that few British Columbians are in favour of trophy hunting and furring,” Insights West vice-president Mario Canseco said.

“At least four-in-five residents voice opposition to both of these practices.”

Support for hunting for food was strongest among men and the middle-aged, but even 68 per cent of women said they were in favour of it.

On trophy hunting, 82 per cent of men and 94 per cent of women opposed the practice.

Respondents to the online survey were less strongly decided on the keeping of animals in captivity.

Fifty-six per cent told Insights West they were in favour of keeping animals in zoos or aquariums, although most of them were only “somewhat” rather than “strongly” supportive.

And 38 per cent said they support using animals in rodeos.

 

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