Plastic bales at Ridge Meadows Recycling Depot, bound for a plant in Delta. (Neil Corbett/THE NEWS)

Bear spray, bullets among hazards that have caused fires at B.C. recycling depots

Recycling BC says that hazardous materials mixed in with paper, plastics are dangerous to workers

Recycle BC is sounding the alarm over the rising number of explosive and hazardous materials being dropped off at recycling depots across the province.

There have been seven fires this year – all caused by dangerous materials – with a number of the blazes temporarily closing down recycling facilities.

“Earlier this month a resident put 58 rounds of live ammunition into their recycling,” David Lefebvre with Recycle BC said in a news release. “We need people to think before they put something that is potentially explosive and deadly into a recycling bin.”

An audit recently done by the not-for-profit recycling organization found that two-thirds of container loads had hazardous materials such as bear spray, bullets and propane canisters mixed in with papers and plastics.

That’s a 47 percent increase over the last five years.

READ MORE: One million recyclable bottles ‘lost’ daily in B.C., foundation says

Not properly disposing of these hazardous objects can prove dangerous for workers who collect and process recycling, and risk of fires or explosions is especially high for material collection vehicles and receiving facilities due to the significant amount of paper on site. The combination of easily flammable material, plenty of oxygen and large amounts of material sorted into piles means that sparks can smolder for lengthy periods of time and go undetected – until it’s too late.

“Sorting and recycling processes are fast-paced, with material constantly getting moved, compacted, and crushed,” said Oleg Vinokurov, industrial engineering manager at Green by Nature.

“A recycling baler can develop pressures of hundreds of pounds per square inch. Compacted at these pressures, any compressed gas cylinder becomes a potential bomb for our employees.”

The organization is reminding the public never to put the following materials in with recycling:

  • Butane and propane canisters
  • Batteries (especially lithium-ion batteries)
  • Compressed gases
  • Ammunition
  • Knives
  • Sharps
  • Bear spray

Recycling BC is urging residents to contact the Recycling Council of B.C. if they aren’t sure how to properly dispose of a hazardous item. The council also has a “recyclepedia” online where anyone can search drop-off locations for specific items.


@ashwadhwani
ashley.wadhwani@bpdigital.ca

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Just Posted

Celebrating winter heritage with Griz Days

Mark your calendars, start doing your snow dance and get ready for… Continue reading

Red Apple hosts kid’s shopping day

On Sunday December 1, Red Apple in Fernie opened its doors for… Continue reading

Lilac Terrace receives $25,000 donation

Lilac Terrace, a senior’s supported living complex owned by the Elk Valley… Continue reading

Support the Cause proceeds assist children with cancer

There were plenty of smiling faces at Western Financial Group on Friday… Continue reading

Second Avenue location home for Coal Town Goods

Fernie’s own Coal Town Goods moved to a new location on Second… Continue reading

B.C. woman charged in connection to stolen vehicle smash-up in Kamloops

Kersten Ina Peters was arrested in the Fraser Valley on Friday, Dec. 6

Tavares scores twice as Maple Leafs earn 4-1 win over Canucks

Vancouver sees two-game win streak snapped

UPDATED: No survivors in Gabriola Island plane crash: RCMP

Coroner confirms multiple fatalities after small plane goes down Tuesday night near Nanaimo

VIDEO: Harbour Air makes history with first electric aircraft test flight

Successful flight marks first of its kind in the world

The Grinch who Stole a Hedge: Security camera captures Chilliwack tree theft

RCMP arrives as person calmly walks away with tree in downtown area

Salmonella outbreak in Canada linked to rodents and snakes

92 cases of salmonella across six provinces, including B.C.

Meng Wanzhou wins right to more documents involving arrest at Vancouver airport

Defence lawyers allege the Huawei executive was unlawfully detained, searched and interrogated

Truck with body inside found at bottom of lake near Kootenay ferry

Investigators believe no foul play is expected but are unsure how the vehicle ended up in the Arrow Lakes

Most Read