Hunting ethics: disposal of wildlife parts

The Conservation Officer Service has received numerous complaints to date regarding improper disposal of wildlife remains by hunters.

  • Sun Dec 2nd, 2012 6:00pm
  • News

A roadside dump site at the Olson pit highway pullout beside the outhouses.

By Trish Burley

Conservation Officer Service

The Conservation Officer Service has received numerous complaints to date regarding improper disposal of wildlife remains by hunters. Some of the complaints include animal parts being dumped in ditches, highway pullouts, near trails, on private property and near residential areas. The few hunters that do this are in violation of the Environmental Management Act: discharge, dump, discard or dispose litter ($115). Aside from giving hunters a negative public image, the waste can attract pets and dangerous wildlife such as bears. Violators can be charged under the Wildlife Act for attracting dangerous wildlife (bears) to land or premises ($230-345).

Hunters are reminded to properly dispose their wildlife parts in a remote area away from hiking/biking trails, campsites, residential areas and watersheds (river, streams and lakes). Disposal can be completed discretely and away from people. The landfill can only be used with small remains in a concealed garbage bag. Following a successful hunt the correct procedure for the disposal of wildlife is an important step towards whole hunting process.

If the public is aware of someone who is dumping wildlife parts in inappropriate areas, please let the Conservation Officer Service know by calling the Report All Poachers and Polluters hotline at (RAPP) at 1-877-952-7277.