Trev Miller, candidate with the Animal Protection Party.

Trev Miller, candidate with the Animal Protection Party.

Kootenay-Columbia candidate cautious after getting threats

Trev Miller of the Animal Protection Party carries on campaigning under shadow of threats, abusive emails

One of the Federal election candidates in Kootenay-Columbia has had to conduct his campaign with caution after receiving threats and a series of abuse-filled emails.

Trev Miller, campaigning for the Animal Protection Party, has contacted the RCMP and reached out to the other candidates, but has carried on with his campaign ahead of the Octiober 21 election.

“I’m cautious, and having to be aware of my surroundings. I’ve already got through it by now, but other people shouldn’t have to be dealing with this.”

The emails, filled with threats and over-the-top insults, accuse Miller of inciting hatred against local famers and criminal language, and refer to the candidate as a criminal, and an unlicensed, self-proclaimed socialist.

“He’s called my work at least once,” Miller said.

The emailer claims to know a couple of Cranbrook ranchers, would like to “punch your boy’s ticket for all the local hatred he is inciting against farmers and ranchers,” according to one missive.

The emailer suggests the candidate should be kidnapped from “one of your Marxist-Leninist Anti-Canada rallies,” taken into the bush and fed to bears, among other such invective.

After contacting the RCMP, the police responded that “they hadn’t really been able to find too much, and to just be careful,” Miller said.

He has accordingly had to campaign under the shadow of such invective.

“That’s why I contacted the other candidates and let them know what’s happening, so they can make their own choices,” he said.

“I’ve gotten to know the other candidates fairly well — we all get along, They sympathize, and were outraged to hear what I was going through.

“It’s always disconcerting to receive this kind of harassment. What I felt most keenly was frustrated that I was having to put time and energy into worrying about my personal safety. I would really rather be focussing on the campaign.”

“It would be ideal if people just respectfully participated in the process. People will have differences of opinions. And the very best thing that someone who doesn’t agree with me can do is go into that voting booth on October 21 and not put a check mark beside my name.”

Miller is one of six candidates in the running in Kootenay-Columbia.

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