Letter to the editor: Response to ALS Ice Bucket Challenge

Eclipsing all other fundraisers, the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge has raised $94.3 million at the time of me writing this [August 27].

  • Sep. 7, 2014 10:00 a.m.

Eclipsing all other fundraisers, the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge has raised $94.3 million at the time of me writing this [August 27], with exponential growth reported daily.

Here in Canada, that amount currently sits at approximately $10 million, with an estimated 2,500 to 3,000 people suffering from ALS across the province. A simple calculation reveals approximately $3,300 in donations distributed to each ALS patient. Compare that figure to a similar neurological disease, Parkinsons.

With 100,000 Parkinsons patients in Canada, the Parkinsons Society of Canada raised $2.76 million dollars last year, which equates to $27 per patient. Quite a difference.

Don’t get me wrong, ALS is a very nasty disease, and I wouldn’t trade my Parkinsons affliction for ALS. No way, Jose.

And if you are someone who chose to dump a bucket of ice water on your head for this worthy cause, I applaud you; as the water streams down your face, hold your head high, you did a great thing.

The point I am trying to make is this: Don’t forget the causes you supported in the past, they rely on your contribution.

Before being diagnosed with Parkinsons, my “go to” charity was cancer. If there is a red-blooded Canadian who doesn’t support the Terry Fox run, I would like to know where he/she is hiding.

After my diagnosis, my focus changed, quite naturally, but I continued to, and will to this day, support the Terry Fox Run.

The ice bucket challenge has thrown a bucket of cold water on our annual SuperWalk for Parkinsons, but YOU CAN HELP! Our Elk Valley walk will be at the Senior’s Drop-in Center in Sparwood on Sept. 13 at 10 a.m.. Bring your appetite, as we will once again offer a free barbeque lunch, along with fabulous door prizes and a silent auction. Oh yeah, and also rain ponchos in case of rain. After all, no one really likes getting wet, do they?

 

Terry Hume

Sparwood, B.C.