Daryn Forsyth resigned from the Canadian Armed Forces shortly after the Jan. 7, 2019 temporary injunction enforcement on Wet’suwet’en territory at Gidimt’en checkpoint. On Feb. 6, 2020 after RCMP enforcement of a subsequent interlocutory injunction, he decided to make his initial resignation letter public in a show of solidarity for the Wet’suwet’en. (Contributed photo)

Man posts 2019 letter resigning from military after latest RCMP enforcement of pipeline order

Daryn Forsyth said he could no longer serve a Crown whose actions he disagreed with

Daryn Forsyth spent a third of his life working in the Canadian Armed Forces (CAF) as a marine engineer but when he saw RCMP enforcement of a temporary injunction on Wet’suwet’en territory on Jan. 7, 2019 he knew he could no longer continue.

On Jan. 19 Forsyth, who is himself part Gitxsan and lives in Hazelton, handed in his resignation letter (which is posted in full at the bottom of this article).

“I wasn’t going to, on Canada’s behalf, commit violence onto anybody,” he said, adding that while he was just a smaller part of a larger system he couldn’t in any good conscience continue working for the army.

Forsyth first got involved with the army after taking an Indigenous recruitment program in 2005. In 2009, after completing his studies, he signed on full-time.

READ MORE: RCMP finishes operations in support of injunction on forest service road

He said the decision to leave a job that has been such a major part of his life was not one he made lightly, but that he couldn’t continue to stand by while the Wet’suwet’en continued to have their territorial rights and title denied to them.

“It’s heartbreaking,” he said. “Seeing the violence that was brought on them [and how] the same Crown I was serving, you know, the same country that I had pledged allegiance to can’t properly take care of their own aboriginal people or even support them.”

Forsyth said his first request for discharge, initially handed in the morning of Jan. 7, 2019, was denied.

“It was initially rejected on the grounds of conscientious objection until i clarified … that, no, I’m unwilling to use a weapon and commit violent acts for Canada.”

After making the decision to leave Forsyth said he subsequently decided to make his letter of resignation public on social media after RCMP action on Feb. 6, 2020 and the days following when they enforced the interlocutory injunction relating to the matter.

He said he felt it was ridiculous to see armed RCMP officers heading into unceded Wet’suwet’en territory once again and that seeing the events of Jan. 7, 2019 essentially repeat themselves a year later was tough to bare.

“It was just a stream of emotions,” he said. “A lot of shame, but that was luckily offset by the pride that I felt seeing these proud warriors standing up and defending their actual land and their way of life.”

Forsyth said the decision to leave the CAF was important to him not just to respect his own Indigenous heritage, but also because members of his extended family are Wet’suwet’en and he stands with the nation as a whole.

He adds he wants them to grow up in a world where the Crown respects their right to defend their unceded homelands.

“Their future really is at risk,” he said of a number of his nieces and nephews who are Wet’suwet’en. “It’s not just this passive risk, it’s actively being destroyed.”

Forsyth added it’s important for him that his son and younger members of his extended family are able to look at him in the future and know that he followed his conscience.

“He needs to know that … choices can be made and even if they’re scary they do need to be made.”

He said his message to members of the armed forces or RCMP who might have their own internal conflicts about how the situation has played out is simple: talk to your superiors.

“Speak to your chain of command,” he said. “Tell them that this is a major concern for you that aboriginal people are being forcibly removed from their lands and that essentially this is the start of another Oka.”

Oka refers to the Oka Crisis of 1990 when a police officer was killed in a standoff between police and the Mohawk people, the latter of who were involved in a land dispute with the town of Oka, Quebec.

While CAF are currently not involved in the dispute between hereditary chiefs of the Wet’suwet’en and Coastal GasLink, Forsyth said when he asked about whether that was a possibility in the future he didn’t get a direct response.

“That was one thing I asked my chain of command when I was leaving, was is there going to be any sort of directive put out saying the military won’t take an active role?” he said.

“I was flat out told no.”

He said his message to RCMP officers is simple: you’re in the wrong.

“It’s the fact that they were created to stop [Indigenous] rebellions and then here we are in 2020 and they’re essentially doing the same thing,” he said.

“They haven’t changed, in fact, I hold each and every RCMP member accountable for their own actions and that also includes being on Gitxsan territory, being on Wet’suwet’en territory, and furthering this colonization and this violence.”



trevor.hewitt@interior-news.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

Coastal GasLink

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

 

Part 1/2 of Forsyth’s resignation letter, which he publicly posted on Facebook Feb. 6 following RCMP enforcement of an interlocutory injunction granted on Dec. 31, 2019. (Facebook photo)

Part 2/2 of Forsyth’s resignation letter, which he publicly posted on Facebook Feb. 6 following RCMP enforcement of an interlocutory injunction granted on Dec. 31, 2019. (Facebook photo)

Just Posted

File photo
Main Roads warns of snow over weekend

It’s expected to snow in most areas covered by the East Kootenay Service Area

Tom Shypitka, Wayne Stetski, Kerri Wall and moderator Thomas Skelton at the Oct. 15 Elk Valley all-candidates forum. (Source: zoom)
At a glance: Kootenay East candidates go head-to-head in Elk Valley forum

Shypitka, Stetski and Wall called in to the zoom forum to talk all things Elk Valley

Kootenay-Columbia MP Rob Morrison speaks during Question Period in the House of Commons.
MP Morrison responds to federal throne speech, pushes for rapid testing at airports

Kootenay-Columbia parliamentarian criticizes throne speech, wants COIVD-19 testing at borders, airports

Anne Jimmie holds up a photo of her and her mother, Christine Jimmy, that was taken in 1948. Photo: Aaron Hemens
Saving the inner child: The Healing Journey

“There was this little girl inside that was so hurt, that was so wounded … I needed to nurture that little girl and understand her.”

Candidates running for Kootenay East participated in a Zoom debate hosted by the Cranbrook Chamber of Commerce on Wednesday afternoon. Trevor Crawley photo.
Candidates debate economic issues during Cranbrook business forum

Topics focused on business and economic issues in forum hosted by Chamber of Commerce

In this photo provided by Shannon Kiss, smoke from the CalWood Fire billows, Sunday, Oct. 18, 2020, as seen from Gunbarrel, Colo. (Shannon Kiss via AP)
‘First guys out:’ western Canadian air tanker fleet busy despite drop in wildfires

CEO believes wildfires have become more dangerous in recent years as people live closer to where they start

Fort St. John councillor Trevor Bolin (B.C. Conservative Party)
BC Conservatives leader fights back after BC Liberals leak 2018 workplace harassment case

Sexual harassment case was connected to employee being terminated, WorkSafeBC found

The BC Ferries vessel the Queen of Oak Bay. (News Bulletin file photo)
‘Buy a boat,’ Horgan advises anti-maskers on BC Ferries

NDP leader John Horgan talks COVID-19 misinformation

Canadian and American flags fly near the Ambassador Bridge at the Canada-USA border crossing in Windsor, Ont. on Saturday, March 21, 2020. Restrictions on non-essential travel between Canada and the United States are being extended until at least Nov. 21. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Rob Gurdebeke
Non-essential travel restrictions at Canada-U.S. border extended to at least Nov. 21

The restrictions do not apply to those providing essential services in either country

Is it time to start thinking about greener ways to package cannabis?

Packaging suppliers are still figuring eco-friendly and affordable packaging options that fit the mandates of Cannabis Regulations

Jordan Naterer, 25, was last seen Saturday Oct. 10. He planned a hike in the Manning Park area, and has not been seen since. Photo Facebook.
Family devastated as search for missing Manning Park hiker suspended

‘It was an extremely difficult meeting with the parents when we had to tell them.’

FILE - Nathan Cullen speaks to media in Smithers, B.C., Friday, February 28, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward
Horgan, Cullen apologize for NDP candidate’s comments about Haida candidate

Nathan Cullen had made insensitive comments about Roy Jones Jr. Cheexial

In this photo illustration, a provincial election mail-in ballot sealed in an Elections B.C. return envelope is seen before being deposited in a Canada Post mailbox, in Richmond, B.C., Saturday, Oct. 17, 2020. The final result of British Columbia’s provincial election won’t be known for at least two weeks because more than 700-thousand mail-in ballots have to be counted by hand. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck
B.C.’s snap election means 700k ballots will be counted manually, delaying results

Elections BC spokesman said employees in 87 electoral districts will count mail-in ballots one by one

Chief Public Health Officer Dr. Theresa Tam takes part during a press conference during the COVID pandemic in Ottawa on Friday, Oct. 16, 2020. As parts of Canada face a new round of COVID-19-related restrictions, Canada’s chief public health officer is urging Canadians to continue making a “collective effort” to tackle the pandemic.THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick
Chief public health officer calls for continued ‘collective effort’ against COVID-19

Canada continues to climb toward the 200,000 mark for COVID-19 cases

Most Read