Beekeepers John Holubeshen, left, Moufida Holubeshen, Peter Lange and Conrad Berube took down a nest of Asian giant hornets on Wednesday night behind Robins Park in Nanaimo. (Photo submitted)

Nanaimo beekeepers take down nest of invasive giant hornets

One nest eradicated at Nanaimo’s Robins Park, but there are still Asian giant hornets around

Local beekeepers went and disturbed a hornets’ nest last night.

Four people, including members of the Nanaimo Beekeepers Club, eradicated a nest of Asian giant hornets that they located along the creek behind Robins Park in Harewood.

Conrad Berube, local beekeeper, said it was John and Moufida Holubeshen, were provided with information about stings and specimens.

“They had a map of tracking information like that and made some very good guesses as to what the biological requirements of the hornets would be,” Berube said.

They called him up because he has experience with removing yellow jackets’ nests, and along with club president Peter Lange, the four of them bundled up in heavy clothing and took down the colony. A carbon-dioxide fire extinguisher was used to “anaesthetize” the hornets, Berube said.

“We proceeded to remove the wasps basically by the handful, putting them in the alcohol until we got to a point where we could remove the rest, which we did,” he said. “We were pretty sure we got the great bulk of the inhabitants.”

Berube said the group initially hoped it was close to wiping out the hornets, but he said there has now been a report of another nest site close by.

“It may be more than a few nests in the area. We’ll see. The good news is, they seem to be restricted to a small area,” he said.

Berube was stung four times during Wednesday’s operation and said although he’s fine, someone who isn’t used to the venom could swell up considerably. He said aside from the health risks for humans, the hornets eat honeybees that are already being harmed by varroa mites and pesticides.

“Our honeybees are already under siege by a variety of factors…” he said. “A predatory hornet that could take out a colony in a matter of hours would be none too welcome.”

The B.C. Ministry of Agriculture noted in a press release that the hornets are being preserved for further research and testing to try to determine their point of origin. The report of a second nest in the area is being investigated, the government said. Those who come across an Asian giant hornet can call the Invasive Species Council of B.C. at 1-888-933-3722 or visit http://bcinvasives.ca/report.

RELATED: Invasive honeybee-eating hornets with toxic sting found in Nanaimo



editor@nanaimobulletin.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

FAR mandates masks

The new rule was set in place to ensure utmost safety of guests and employees

Elk Valley businesses back Work in Fernie website

The Fernie Chamber of Commerce’s ‘Work in Fernie’ website has been getting plenty of traffic

Elk Valley Alliance plans out decades-long study into water temperatures in Elk Valley

The alliance is hoping to track changes in water temperature around the valley for decades to come

Spardell Trailer Park residents left without running water for three days

Multiple residents told The Free Press it was an ongoing, seemingly endless problem

Sparwood’s Causeway Bay Hotel reports COVID-positive guest

The hotel manager said guests who ate at the Gateway Restaurant at the same time do not need to be tested

‘Don’t kill my mom’: Ryan Reynolds calls on young British Columbians to be COVID-smart

‘Deadpool’ celebrity responds to premier’s call for social influence support

Widow of slain Red Deer doctor thanks community for support ahead of vigil

Fellow doctors, members of the public will gather for a physically-distanced vigil in central Alberta

Protesters showcase massive old yellow cedar as Port Renfrew area forest blockade continues

9.5-foot-wide yellow cedar measured by Ancient Forest Alliance campaigners in Fairy Creek watershed

Taking dog feces and a jackhammer to neighbourhood dispute costs B.C. man $16,000

‘Pellegrin’s actions were motivated by malice …a vindictive, pointless, dangerous and unlawful act’

Racist stickers at Keremeos pub leaves group uneasy and angry

The ‘OK’ hand gesture is a known hate-symbol

VIDEO: World responds to B.C. girl after pandemic cancels birthday party

Dozens of cards and numerous packages were delivered to six-year-old Charlie Manning

Expected fall peak of COVID-19 in Canada could overwhelm health systems: Tam

National modelling projections released Friday show an expected peak in cases this fall

Hundreds of sea lions to be killed on Columbia River in effort to save endangered fish

Nearly 22,000 comments received during public review were opposed, fewer than 200 were for

Most Read