New craft brewery bubbles up in Creston

Brewmaster Casey Staple and co-owners Craig and Lisa Wood pose at Wild North Brewing Company on their opening day. (Photo by Kelsey Yates)Brewmaster Casey Staple and co-owners Craig and Lisa Wood pose at Wild North Brewing Company on their opening day. (Photo by Kelsey Yates)
Patrons can fill a 64-ounce growler with their beer of choice. (Photo by Kelsey Yates)Patrons can fill a 64-ounce growler with their beer of choice. (Photo by Kelsey Yates)
Lisa Wood serves a flight sampler to their first customers of the day. (Photo by Kelsey Yates)Lisa Wood serves a flight sampler to their first customers of the day. (Photo by Kelsey Yates)
Some of the first customers on opening day check out the menu. (Photo by Kelsey Yates)Some of the first customers on opening day check out the menu. (Photo by Kelsey Yates)
Craig Wood pours a beer. There’s currently six different brews on tap. (Photo by Kelsey Yates)Craig Wood pours a beer. There’s currently six different brews on tap. (Photo by Kelsey Yates)
A popular option is the flight sampler, with a choice of four beers. (Photo by Kelsey Yates)A popular option is the flight sampler, with a choice of four beers. (Photo by Kelsey Yates)

Wild North Brewing, the newest addition to the Creston Valley, recently opened its doors and turned on the taps.

Despite some rain on May 20, patrons lined up outside for opening day and waited patiently for a fresh pint of beer.

The brewery is owned by couple Craig and Lisa Wood, who were born and raised in Creston, along with partners Tyler Mailhot, Jon Haberstock, Mark Hug, and Aaron Groenhuysen.

“We’re all high school friends, and we’ve brought our unique talents together to make this happen,” said Craig Wood.

He learned the necessary logistics of owning a brewery from previously working at Columbia Brewery for 21 years.

“This was my dream,” he said. “It was never about money or success. We just want to bring something unique, vibrant, and cool to our old hometown.”

It took about a year of planning for construction, with design plans from a Nelson-based architect. The group pushed through and remained confident despite the pandemic.

The materials used in the build were harvested and sourced from B.C., with stainless steel from Summerland and lumber from J.H. Huscroft Ltd. in Creston.

“We’re looking forward to creating a great atmosphere here with smiling faces on the patio listening to music,” he said.

“We want to keep it a really casual vibe and make it a great place for tourists to stop.”

Once indoor dining is back to normal, families will be welcome to play board games or bring in their own snacks. At the front doors, all of the local takeout menus are laid out and food trucks will also be stopping by the parking lot.

Their own small menu at Wild North Brewing consists of a charcuterie board, pretzels and beer cheese, and chips and salsa.

Brewmaster Casey Staple is the creative talent behind the rotating selection of unique brews.

“The menu we have right now shows versatility and proves that beer doesn’t have to be generic or boring,” he said. “You can push the limits.”

Right now, Wild North Brewing offers six different beers on tap including a thirst-quenching lager, a hazy IPA, a West Coast IPA, a dry hopped sour, a raspberry fruit sour, and a porter to cater to the dark beer lovers.

With their in-house flight sampler, patrons get to choose four beers to try and sip.

There’s also the option to fill up a 64-ounce growler with a beer of choice. The glass jugs are stamped with their own logo and have proven to be popular already, with over 70 sold on opening day.

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Craft BreweriesCreston Valley

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