Second $100M settlement reached in RCMP sexual harassment class action

They who reached a similar deal with its female Mounties three years ago

Women who were sexually harassed while working for the RCMP in non-policing roles after 1974 could be eligible for a chunk of a new $100-million settlement.

Klein Lawyers LLP and Higgerty Law announced the settlement Monday, after the class action lawsuit was certified on July 5.

It’s the second sexual harassment settlement for the RCMP, who reached a similar deal with its female Mounties three years ago.

Monday’s settlement includes a confidential independent claims process led by female assessors. Claimants are eligible for anywhere from $10,000 to $220,000 for harassment suffered between Sept. 16, 1974 to July 5, 2019.

“This settlement is an acknowledgement of the pain experienced by women who were subjected to harassment and sexual assault while working or volunteering with the RCMP,” said Angela Bespflug of Klein Lawyers LLP.

“No amount of money can compensate these women for the harms that they’ve endured, but the settlement gives a voice to their experiences.”

In a statement, RCMP Commissioner Brenda Lucki thanked representative plaintiffs Cheryl Tiller, Mary Ellen Copland and Dayna Roach for coming forward.

Lucki said although the woman affected by Monday’s settlement were not RCMP members, “they worked with us on our premises and had every right to feel safe and be treated with respect and dignity.”

Monday settlement must still be approved by the Federal Court. The hearing is scheduled for Oct. 17 in Vancouver.

READ MORE: Sexual harassment lawsuit settled against ex-Mountie Tim Shields

READ MORE: #MeToo at work: B.C. women share horrifyingly common sexual assaults

READ MORE: ‘They gave me my life back’: RCMP member on harassment report


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