B.C. Hydro says it’s the cooking, not the TVs, that causes the most power usage during the Super Bowl. File photo

Superbowl spikes power consumption pre-game: BC Hydro

BC Hydro finds electricity use spikes in the kitchen before the big game

Super Bowl Sunday may seem excessive in most ways, but when it comes to electricity consumption, the real battle is in the lead up to kick-off in the kitchen, not the main event.

Despite consuming massive amounts of things like chicken wings and beer, electricity use during the game does not increase more than a typical Sunday. However, preparations for hosting, or bringing food, to the event do have an impact on home electricity usage starting at about 11 a.m. In the past four years, the increase has been about eight per cent on average, most of which can be attributed to pre-game food preparation. That’s equivalent to cooking 2.4 million frozen pizzas.

By the time kick-off happens at 3 p.m., the increased electricity load drops off to what BC Hydro would typically experience on a Sunday. Despite an estimated 4.5 million people watching the Super Bowl every year in Canada, BC Hydro does not see an increase during the game.

Related: Come together: Super Bowl Sunday, the last stand of live TV

This can partially be attributed to collective watching. During the event, many people gather to attend parties hosted by friends or family, or head out to a restaurant or bar to watch the game. As a result, there are fewer screens on during the game than might be expected. Most people also forgo other energy consuming activities — like laundry or washing dishes — during the game, which is another reason there is not a big increase in power consumption.

To improve energy efficiency stats during the pre-game, BC Hydro recommends things like forgoing the preheat: Unless baking, most dishes do not need a pre-heated oven. While it may take the chicken wings a little longer to cook, the oven will use less energy.

Opting for smaller appliances: Where possible, use a smaller appliance such as a toaster oven, slow cooker or Instant Pot. These can use up to 75 per cent less electricity than an electric oven.

Skipping the heat-dry function: A house full of guests can produce a lot of dirty dishes. Turning off the heat-dry feature on the dishwasher can cut its electricity use in half.

Lowering the thermostat: Cooking can increase a household’s temperature significantly — lower the thermostat to a recommended 18 degrees Celsius.

For more information on how to save energy and money, visit powersmart.ca.


Steve Kidd
Senior reporter, Penticton Western News
Email me or message me on Facebook
Follow us on Facebook | Twitter | Instagram

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

West Kootenay couple escapes Spain – safe, sound, and in self-isolation

BC couple Garrett Kucher and Tory Apostoliuk make it home after almost a week of lockdown in Spain

Emergency response teams continue services during pandemic

The RCMP, SAR, and fire department proceed with operations throughout COVID-19 situation

Social media a blessing and a curse during time of crisis: B.C. communication expert

‘In moments of crisis, fear is very real and palpable,’ says SFU’s Peter Chow-White

Mental health in the time of COVID-19

Taking care of our mental health is just as important as protecting our physical health

Interior Health officials outline pandemic response in virtual town hall

Kelowna-Lake County MLA Norm Letnick moderates digital discussion, Q&A with Interior Health leadership

Evening world update: U.S. restrictions extended 30 days; NY deaths near 1,000

Comprehensive world update, with the latest developments in the COVID-19 crisis

‘Nothing concrete’: Tenants, landlords lack details after B.C. unveils COVID-19 rental aid

Single mom in Golden says she’s already going to the food bank after being laid off

Canada will make sure masks sent by China meet quality standards: Trudeau

Chinese Embassy tweeted that China was sending 30,000 medical masks along with gowns, gloves and goggles

B.C. issues guidelines about distancing, reusable bags to grocery stores amid COVID-19

Hand sanitizer and markers to keep lines two metres are apart are needed, province says

No plans to call in military right now to enforce COVID-19 quarantine: Trudeau

Trudeau unveils $7.5M for Kids Help Phone, $9M for vulnerable seniors amid COVID-19

QUIZ: How much do you know about the Olympics?

Put your knowledge to the test with these 12 questions

B.C. announces $3M for food banks to increase capacity during COVID-19

It is not clear how much of the money will flow towards Greater Victoria food banks

B.C. is seeing the highest rate of COVID-19 recovery in Canada, and there’s a few reasons why

British Columbia was one of the first to see rise in COVID-19 cases, and has also switched up testing

Most Read