Canadian bobsledder Kaillie Humphries files lawsuit in bid to race for U.S.

Two-time world champion wants to expedite release from national team after filing harassment claims

Canadian Olympic athlete Kaillie Humphries poses for a photo at the Olympic Summit in Calgary in 2017. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jeff McIntosh

Kaillie Humphries, a two-time Olympic bobsled gold medallist for Canada and one of the top drivers in her sport’s history, is planning to race for the United States this coming season and beyond — including at the 2022 Beijing Olympics.

Humphries has been seeking her release from Canada for several weeks, and she has filed suit against Bobsleigh Canada in an effort to expedite that release. She is marrying former U.S. men’s bobsledder Travis Armbruster on Saturday, and that would allow her to represent the U.S. in competition — provided she is released by Canada.

Humphries is expected to compete in next week’s U.S. push championships as a guest.

“We look forward to working with Kaillie once she gets her release from Bobsleigh Canada,” USA Bobsled and Skeleton said in a statement provided early Friday to The Associated Press. “Kaillie is a tremendous competitor and has had the respect and admiration of USABS athletes and staff for many years.”

Humphries has been estranged from the Canadian bobsled program for more than a year after filing harassment and abuse claims. She did not race last season and hasn’t competed in a major international race since winning a bronze medal at the 2018 Pyeongchang Olympics.

She is suing Bobsleigh Canada Skeleton for blocking her release, according to CBC.

“They have not provided me a safe place to come back to compete,” Humphries said in an email.

USA Bobsled and Skeleton has told Humphries — a two-time world champion and four-time overall World Cup champion — that it would welcome her to the team.

Under international rules, she would need to be released by the Canadian team by Sept. 30 to be able to compete for the U.S. this season, though it’s always possible that could be appealed. The U.S. team is set to begin training on ice in early October, weather permitting.

The governing body confirmed the lawsuit to The Canadian Press on Thursday.

“Bobsleigh Canada Skeleton abides by its harassment and discrimination policy that has been in place since 2006,” a statement said. “We can’t provide any comments since this investigation is strictly private.”

— with files from The Canadian Press

The Associated Press

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