Williams Lake’s Trey Felker looks up at Anahim Lake’s Carey Price during a visit to the team’s practice facility in Montreal earlier this spring. Felker was afforded the trip after being selected as one of three winners of the Breakfast Club of Canada and the Air Canada Foundation’s Shooting for the Stars program. (Marï Photographe)

Williams Lake’s Trey Felker looks up at Anahim Lake’s Carey Price during a visit to the team’s practice facility in Montreal earlier this spring. Felker was afforded the trip after being selected as one of three winners of the Breakfast Club of Canada and the Air Canada Foundation’s Shooting for the Stars program. (Marï Photographe)

First Nations NHL goaltender Carey Price lends voice to anti-racism movement

Price has joined a growing group of professional athletes speaking out publicly against racism

Carey Price has joined a growing group of professional athletes speaking out publicly against racism.

The Montreal Canadiens netminder from Anahim Lake, B.C. posted a poignant message on his Facebook page Wednesday denouncing social inequalities.

Price said he is in full support of the peaceful movement to acknowledge injustices faced by black Americans and wrote about his own, Indigenous family’s history.

“My grandmother faced social injustices as a young girl in residential school,” Price stated. “I learned at an early age these acts are not tolerable. The mistreatment and misplacement of First Nations peoples in America and Canada has echoed generations of poverty and substance abuse. These facts must also be brought to light.”

READ MORE: History of systemic racism between RCMP and First Nations must be addressed: Chief

He added he is a firm believer in the victory of good over evil and is confident change will come.

“In our house we will not see the colour of your skin, but the character of your heart,” Price added. “God bless you all. Stay safe.”

As of Thursday morning almost 6,000 people had liked the post, and it had been shared closed to 800 times.

Price is a long-time supporter of youth hockey in the Cariboo Chilcotin region where he is from. He has donated thousands of dollars in equipment to hockey associations, youth organizations and schools in the region, and visits the area regularly.

He also hosts children from throughout the province for a visit to Montreal annually in his role as the national ambassador for the Breakfast Club of Canada, which aims to provide fresh, nutritious meals for children in schools.

Price’s mom, Lynda Price, is the current chief of the Ulkatcho First Nation, located roughly 318 kilometres west of Williams Lake, where Price grew up.

Price honed his skills as a goaltender in the Williams Lake Minor Hockey Association, before playing junior hockey in Williams Lake and Quesnel, prior to playing in the Western Hockey League with the Tri-City Americans.

In June of 2015 after being awarded the NHL’s Hart Trophy for most valuable player, the Vezina Trophy for the NHL’s best goaltender, the Ted Lindsay Award and the Jennings Trophy, Price gave an emotional speech encouraging First Nations youth to be leaders in their communities.

“Be proud of your heritage and don’t be discouraged from the improbable,” he said.

His former teammate in Montreal, P.K. Subban, has also voiced his support for change.



greg.sabatino@wltribune.com

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