Man who hit moose on northern highway wins battle with ICBC

Ronald Driedger slammed on his brakes, wrecking them, before hitting a moose

A B.C. man whose quick reflexes to slam his brakes to the floor before hitting a large moose on a highway near Smithers was miraculously able to leave the scene alive, but it was the car repairs that proved to be much more chaotic.

Ronald Driedger hit the moose late in the evening on Aug. 3, 2018, according to documents released by B.C.’s Civil Resolution Tribunal on Tuesday. The tribunal handles small claim disputes in the province.

The moose survived and ran off, Driedger told the tribunal, but the brakes on his 2008 Mazda 3 were wrecked

Two days after the crash, “he noticed his brakes were ‘soft.’ He had to pump the brakes repeatedly to fully stop,” the decision reads. “When the vehicle was stopped but in gear, the brakes cou;d not keep the car from creeping forward.”

Another two days later, Driedger called ICBC and placed a claim for the damage.

READ MORE: South Cariboo driver hits four cows due to fog

According to an estimator, the brake problem was likely caused by the master cylinder failing, making it unable to create enough pressure for the brake fluid to be pushed into the brake circuit.

But ICBC denied Driedger’s claim shortly after, and said he hadn’t proved the damage was caused by the collision and insinuated it was likely due to wear and tear.

The tribunal heard that an ICBC employee didn’t believe the estimator’s hypothesis, and concluded that “one simple panic stop should under no circumstances result in brake system damage.”

Driedger appealed ICBC’s decision to the incurance corporation’s Claims Coverage Committee. On April 16 of this year – roughly eight months after the crash – the committee also rejected the claim, and said it “found that this pre-existing defect would have eventually failed under hard braking, even though the applicant may not have known about it.”

That is when Driedger filed his claim with the Civil Rights Tribunal, which sided with the B.C. man.

In his decision, tribunal member Eric Regehr wrote that the brakes were damaged “very close in time to the collision” and that the sequence of events which led to the wrecked brakes added up.

“I find that whether there was a pre-existing issue with the brakes, as ICBC alleges, is not relevant,” he added.

ICBC was ordered to pay Driedger roughly $1,900 in compensation – including $1,700 for the brake repairs and $200 for tribunal fees and additional reimbursement.


@ashwadhwani
ashley.wadhwani@bpdigital.ca

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Fernie real estate market sees effects of COVID-19

The way Elk Valley realtors work amidst COVID-19 is constantly evolving

COVID-19 greatly impacts future of seasonal workers

Faced with job loss and lack of financial support, many overseas workers were forced to return home

Fernie Rotary supports Days for Girls

The Rotary club donated $250 towards the Fernie chapter of the international organization

The importance of staying active during self isolation

Maintaining an exercise regime is critical to mental health during stressful times

Elk Valley holds on to hope while pandemic ensues

Weeks into the COVID-19 crisis, communities in the Elk Valley continue to find ways to spread joy

COVID-19: 4 new deaths, 25 new cases but only in Vancouver Coastal, Fraser Health

A total of 1,291 people have tested positive for the novel coronavirus

Blasting through the West Kootenay

80 years ago; ‘Pretty near all the people from Fruitvale were working on it’

COVID-19: Don’t get away for Easter weekend, Dr. Bonnie Henry warns

John Horgan, Adrian Dix call 130 faith leaders as holidays approach

COVID-19: Trudeau says 30K ventilators on the way; 3.6M Canadians claim benefits

Canada has seen more than 17,000 cases and at least 345 deaths due to COVID-19

RCMP call on kids to name latest foal recruits

The baby horses names are to start with the letter ‘S’

As Canadians return home amid pandemic, border crossings dip to just 5% of usual traffic

Non-commercial land crossing dipped by 95%, air travel dropped by 96 per cent, according to the CBSA

Logan Boulet Effect: Green Shirt Day calls on Canadians to become organ donors

While social distancing, the day also honours the 16 lives lost in the 2018 Humboldt Broncos Crash

COMMENTARY: Knowing where COVID-19 cases are does not protect you

Dr. Bonnie Henry explains why B.C. withholds community names

Most Read