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Reader Poll

In 2016, the Ministry of Transportation and Infrastructure (MOTI) installed two wildlife detection systems in the Elk Valley; one west of Fernie in the rock cuts, and one east of Sparwood.

According to MOTI there are nine thermal cameras set up in each wildlife detection corridor, and they work in conjunction with radar sensors to detect wildlife and alert drivers of their presence with flashing roadside signs. The two detection systems cover about nine kilometres of Highway 3 where large populations of animals tend to roam. The two systems cost approximately $1.5M to install.

Poll Question: As a driver, do you think these systems are an effective way to avoid collisions with wildlife?