Temple priest Karaj Singh and temple executive member Balhar Dosanjh said they are saddened and fearful after racist graffiti was written near the temple on Pine Street. Angie Mindus photo

VIDEO: B.C. Sikh man offers unknown culprit behind racist graffiti ‘a cup of tea’

Longtime Williams Lake resident Balhar Dosanjh is a peaceful man

Members of Williams Lake’s Sikh community are inviting the person responsible for writing racist graffiti on temple property to “come in for a cup of tea” and get to know them.

“We are peaceful people. We follow a peaceful religion,” said Balhar Dosanjh, standing in the pouring rain Friday morning outside the Gurdwara Western Singh Sabha Temple located at 3015 Pine Street in Williams Lake.

Dosanjh has lived in Williams Lake since 1976 and considers Williams Lake his home. He is on the Gurdwara Western Singh Sabha executive and visits the temple to pray once, sometimes twice, per day.

READ MORE: Festival of Lights brightens up the lives of women

The graffiti, written hastily in black marker or paint on a retaining wall, says “Welcome 9-11 contributors” and is visible on the driveway into the temple.

Dosanjh said he felt fearful immediately when he first saw it.

“I can’t explain it (the feeling),” he said. “It made me feel sick.”

WATCH: Flag raised for Vaisakhi in Williams Lake

Video footage obtained through temple security system shows a suspect dressed in dark clothing the morning of Tuesday, June 25 starting to write the graffiti, stop and then come back and finish it.

Dosanjh offered an invitation to that person responsible to come to the temple and “have a cup of tea, get to know us.”

He does not want to see this continue, as the Sikh community is still reeling from a 2006 arson at the temple which caused more than $1 million damage.

“We are peaceful people. If somebody want to come in and know who we are, what we do and how we preach, they can come in or phone us and have a cup of tea with us. If they spend time with us they will learn … that is my message to everybody. Come in, phone us, we will sit together.”


Do you have a comment about this story? email:
editor@wltribune.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Just Posted

Survivor of near-drowning in Elk Valley lake viewing life through new eyes

“If I died that day, the baby wouldn’t know his dad,” said 31-year-old Mariano Santander-Melo.

Cannabis stores in Fernie get green light, open in one month

Two cannabis stores in Fernie could be open for non-medical sales in… Continue reading

Annual Columbia Basin Culture tour coming up Aug 10 and 11

There are locations across the region participating

Structure fire near Elko quickly contained, spreading prevented

A quick response by local firefighters today prevented the spread of a… Continue reading

Stetski talks up NDP election platform

NDP candidate for Kootenay-Columbia riding outlines election ‘commitments’ to Canadian voters

Joaquin ‘El Chapo’ Guzman sentenced to life in prison

Experts say he will likely wind up at the federal government’s Supermax prison in Florence, Colorado

Will you be celebrating national hotdog day with any of these crazy flavours?

The popularity of hotdogs spans generations, cultures

Former home of accused Penticton shooter vandalized

Ex-wife of man who is accused of murdering four people had her house vandalized

‘Beyond the call’: Teen in police custody gets birthday surprise by B.C. Mountie

Unusual celebration started when Staff Sgt. Paul Vadik went to visit the teen in his Coquitlam cell

Thunderstorms forecast across B.C.

Environment Canada has issued a thunderstorm watch for B.C.’s central Interior

B.C. mom to go to Europe court in hopes of getting alleged abducted daughter back

Tasha Brown alleges her estranged wife abducted their daughter Kaydance Etchells in 2016

Driver who killed B.C. motorcyclist receives absolute discharge

Chase family speechless following decision by BC Review Board

Lower gas prices slow annual inflation rate to Bank of Canada’s 2% bull’s-eye

Prices showed strength in other areas — led by a 17.3 per cent increase in the cost of fresh vegetables

B.C. moves to preserve 54 of its biggest, oldest trees

Fir, cedar, spruce, pine, yew set aside from logging

Most Read