Effective April 1, 2021 through March 31, 2023, the daily quota for cutthroat trout in St. Mary Lake will be reduced from five to zero. (Corey Bullock/Cranbrook Townsman file)

Effective April 1, 2021 through March 31, 2023, the daily quota for cutthroat trout in St. Mary Lake will be reduced from five to zero. (Corey Bullock/Cranbrook Townsman file)

2021-23 BC Fishing Regulations see changes in Kootenay region

The daily quota for cutthroat trout in St. Mary Lake will be reduced from five to zero

The release of the BC Freshwater Fishing Regulations Synopsis for 2021-23 brings several changes in region four – Kootenay – affecting Cranbrook and Kimberley locals.

Effective April 1, 2021 through March 31, 2023, the daily quota for cutthroat trout in St. Mary Lake will be reduced from five to zero.

Region-wide, an amendment changes the regional daily quota regulation of 15 fish (any size) to 15 fish (no more than five over 30 centimetres).

For the Upper West Arm of Kootenay Lake, regulations allow the retention of kokanee on April 1 to April 3 and July 1 to July 2.

As always, the general regulations include no fishing in any stream in region four from April 1 to June 14, when the rivers are closed for the annual spawn.

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The Ministry of Forests Lands, Natural Resourse Operations and Rural Development (FLNRO) says the yearly closure ensures for successful reproduction, avoiding having anglers disturb or walk on any developing eggs in the sand and gravel.

While streams are closed during this time, lake fishing is still permitted (with some exceptions).

Single, barbless hooks must be used in streams of region four, all year.

Region four spans north Cranbrook to Valemont, east to Alberta, south to the US Border, and west past Revelstoke, Nakusp and Castlegar.

The 2021-23 Freshwater Fishing Regulations Synopsis is now available online. These regulations are in effect from April…

Posted by Go Fish BC on Monday, March 29, 2021

Many other changes across B.C. will be in effect from 2021 to 2023, so it’s important that anglers check the regulations in general.

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Fishing license renewals are also coming up and are available from April 1.

Starting this year, new license purchase options are available for anglers age 65 and older. Go Fish BC explains online that in response to public requests to support freshwater fishing in BC, resident anglers age 65+ can now choose between purchasing a license for the regular rate of $36 or for the discounted rate of $5.

“The option of paying for a regular rate licence gives senior freshwater fishers the opportunity to support stocking and conservation efforts in the province, while still offering a reduced cost to ensure licence fees are not a barrier to access for senior anglers.”

“One hundred percent of the revenue generated from fishing licences is distributed to two non-profit organizations to directly benefit recreational fisheries. Approximately $29 of a BC Resident Annual Licence goes to the Freshwater Fisheries Society of BC to fund research, conservation, education, and the provincial recreational stocking program.”

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